1. PLoS One. 2013;8(3):e58476. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0058476. Epub 2013 Mar 25.

Brain changes in long-term zen meditators using proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy and diffusion tensor imaging: a controlled study.Este enlace se abrirá en una ventana nueva
Fayed NEste enlace se abrirá en una ventana nueva,
Lopez Del Hoyo Y, Andres E, Serrano-Blanco A, Bellón J, Aguilar K, Cebolla A, Garcia-Campayo J.
Source: Department of Radiology, Hospital Quirónsalud, Zaragoza, Spain.

Abstract
INTRODUCTION: This work aimed to determine whether (1)H magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS), diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) are correlated with years of meditation and psychological variables in long-term Zen meditators compared to healthy non-meditator controls.
MATERIALS AND METHODS: Design. Controlled, cross-sectional study. Sample. Meditators were recruited from a Zen Buddhist monastery. The control group was recruited from hospital staff. Meditators were administered questionnaires on anxiety, depression, cognitive impairment and mindfulness. (1)H-MRS (1.5 T) of the brain was carried out by exploring four areas: both thalami, both hippocampi, the posterior superior parietal lobule (PSPL) and posterior cingulate gyrus. Predefined areas of the brain were measured for diffusivity (ADC) and fractional anisotropy (FA) by MR-DTI.
RESULTS: Myo-inositol (mI) was increased in the posterior cingulate gyrus and Glutamate (Glu), N-acetyl-aspartate (NAA) and N-acetyl-aspartate/Creatine (NAA/Cr) was reduced in the left thalamus in meditators. We found a significant positive correlation between mI in the posterior cingulate and years of meditation (r = 0.518; p = .019). We also found significant negative correlations between Glu (r = -0.452; p = .045), NAA (r = -0.617; p = .003) and NAA/Cr (r = -0.448; P = .047) in the left thalamus and years of meditation. Meditators showed a lower Apparent Diffusion Coefficient (ADC) in the left posterior parietal white matter than did controls, and the ADC was negatively correlated with years of meditation (r = -0.4850, p = .0066).
CONCLUSIONS: The results are consistent with the view that mI, Glu and NAA are the most important altered metabolites. This study provides evidence of subtle abnormalities in neuronal function in regions of the white matter in meditators.

PMID: 23536796 [PubMed - in process]
PMCID: PMC3607604

Free PMC Article

2. Acta Psychiatr Scand. 2012 Aug;126(2):115-25. doi: 10.1111/j.1600-0447.2011.01820.x. Epub 2011 Dec 30.

Brain dysfunction in fibromyalgia and somatization disorder using proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy: a controlled study.Este enlace se abrirá en una ventana nueva
Fayed NEste enlace se abrirá en una ventana nueva, Andres E, Rojas G, Moreno S, Serrano-Blanco A, Roca M, Garcia-Campayo J.
Source: Department of Radiology, Quirónsalud Hospital, Zaragoza, Spain.

Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the brain metabolite patterns in patients with fibromyalgia (FM) and somatization disorder (STD) compared with healthy controls through spectroscopy techniques and correlate these patterns with psychological variables.
METHOD: Design. Controlled, cross-sectional study. Sample. Patients were recruited from primary care in Zaragoza, Spain. The control group was recruited from hospital staff. Patients were administered questionnaires on pain catastrophizing, anxiety, depression, pain, quality of life, and cognitive impairment. All patients underwent Magnetic Resonance Imaging and magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS).
RESULTS: A significant increase was found in the glutamate + glutamine (Glx) levels in the posterior cingulate cortex (PCC): 10.73 (SD: 0.49) for FM and 9.67 (SD: 1.10) for STD 9.54 (SD: 1.46) compared with controls (P = 0.043). In the FM + STD group, a correlation between Glx and pain catastrophizing in PCC (r = 0.397; P = 0.033) and between quality of life and the myo-inositol/creatine ratio in the left hippocampus (r = -0.500; P = 0.025) was found. To conclude Glutamate seems to be relevant in the molecular processes involved in FM and STD. It also opens the door for Proton MRS ((1) H-MRS) in STD and suggests that reducing glutamatergic activity through pharmacological treatment could improve the outcome of patients with FM and STD.
CONCLUSION: Glutamate seems to be relevant in the molecular processes involved in FM and STD. It also opens the door for Proton MRS ((1) H-MRS) in STD and suggests that reducing glutamatergic activity through pharmacological treatment could improve the outcome of patients with FM and STD.

© 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

PMID:22211322 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]